Archive for the ‘Enacting spaces’ Category

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Shifting ontologies of a serious game and its relationships with English education for beginners

March 29, 2011

Just want to raise awareness of a series of papers to be published in a special issue of E-learning and Digital Media, Vol 8, issue 3, 2011.

The call for papers is copy-pasted below:

“Media: Digital, Ecological and Epistemological

Special issue of E-Learning and Digital Media, Editor Dr. Norm Friesen

Media today are everywhere. From educational gaming through portable e-texts to cell phones ringing in class, it seems we can’t escape. Nor can we live without media; instead, they form a kind of ecology that we inhabit. In addition, media have an epistemological function; they shape both what we know and how we come to know it: “Whatever we know about our society, or indeed about the world in which we live,” as Niklas Luhman observed, “we know through… media.”

Speaking of media in education suggests a range of possibilities that are different from what is suggested by educational technology (electronic, digital or otherwise). Describing computers and the Internet specifically as digital media casts their role not as mental tools to be integrated into instruction, but as “forms” and “cultures” requiring “literacies” or acculturation. In this way, speaking of media in education brings instructional environments more closely together with the world outside. Explorations of these terms and possibilities have been initiated by the likes of Marshall McLuhan, Neil Postman and Elizabeth Eisenstein, and they are also touched upon in research on media literacies. However, more recent theoretical developments and accelerated mediatic change –from blogging through networked gaming to texting and sexting– offer innumerable opportunities for further exploration.

This special issue of E-Learning and Digital Media invites contributions that focus on media, particularly digital media, and their ecological and epistemological ramifications. Specific topics may include:

  • School and classroom as media (ecologies) and the changing world outside
  • Digital challenges to media literacy and literacies
  • Media socialization and media education
  • Histories of media and education
  • The epistemological character of (new) media”

To see the draft of table of contents for this special issue:  Issuecontents ELEA 8_3_proof

Our paper:

Shifting ontologies of a serious game and its relationships with English education for beginners

Publication: Research – peer review › Article

This paper takes its point of departure in a language project, which is a subproject under the larger ongoing (2007-2011) research project Serious Games on a Global Market Place. The language project follows how the virtual universe known as Mingoville (http://www.mingoville.com/) becomes an actor in English education for beginners. The virtual universe provides an online environment for students beginning to learn English in schools and at home. This paper will focus on the shifting ontologies of Mingoville and teaching and learning situations in beginners’ English. This paper takes its point of departure in neither Mingoville as part of the media ecologies of the classroom, nor in the epistemological ramifications of Mingoville. Instead, it suggests that opening up the shifting ontologies of Mingoville (i.e. what mediates Mingoville and its relationships with doing beginners English) may offer a different and useful approach to understanding how Mingoville becomes a multiple actor. It reveals that such an actor both influences, and is influenced by, manifold constitutive entanglements involved in organizing English teaching and learning activities for beginners. Theoretically and methodologically, the paper, the empirical gatherings and analysis, are inspired by science and technology studies (STS) and actor-network-theory (ANT). The arguments and descriptions provided throughout the paper will focus on the shifting ontologies of Mingoville as it moves into, and out of, different teaching and learning situations of English for beginners.
Original language English
Journal E-Learning and Digital Media
Publication date 2011
Volume 8
Journal number 3
Number of pages 24
ISSN 1741-8887

Keywords

  • English education for beginners, e-learning, Digital learning resources, Virtual worlds, primary and lower secondary school, media and ICT, ANT (Actor-Network-Theory), Entanglement approach, Relational Ontology, serious games, Educational technology research

APA

Hansbøl, M., & Meyer, B. (2011). Shifting ontologies of a serious game and its relationships with English education for beginners. E-Learning and Digital Media, 8(3).
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Exploring Learning Space Designs

August 22, 2010

From the conference on ICT and Innovative Learning Environments in Danish Universities, I took with me several insights that I want to share and have already done so in several blogposts.

– Matters of e-learning are about open explorations of learning space designs. This, of course, can mean many things…

Phillip D. Long was one of the key note speakers and workshop presenters who is looking at different open source tools on the Internet that can be engaged as ressources in academic activities (i.e. for the educator, researcher, and the learner). At the workshop he mentioned a long list of open source tools. He is making the list available online, and I look forward to this! 

He has also written a book chapter on “Trends in Learning Space Design”. The chapter is part of a book on “Learning Spaces” available at the Educause homepage, which is surely a visit worth for anyone wanting to gain inspiration for higher education use of ICT. I also just stumbled on this interview with him. It includes interesting references to other writings by Phillip D. Long on open frameworks for education and open courseware.

– in Denmark we have several takes on what open explorations of learning space designs are about.

Christian Dalsgaard is one of the researchers who are focusing on as well as advocating open source approches to the design of learning spaces. He is among other the author of the article “Social software: E-learning beyond learning management systems“. Dalsgaard encourages what he calls self-governed communication and learning environments. His approach takes point of departure in the individual student’s options to choose from and engage with the vast variety of open sources that exist and are available and free on the Internet.

Virtual Worlds like Second Life are for some researchers the point of entrance to new matters of e-learning. In Denmark, for instance, Marianne Riis has dedicated her PhD research to “Exploring 3D remediation: research, teaching and learning with and in a new media”. Her blog is worth a visit.

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This is where the internet ends

February 8, 2008

There exist many versions of the very last page of the internet in English and Danish, and most likely in any language.

I’m interested in these kinds of pages (presented as one here) because I see them as examples of enacting spatiality through inserting differences.

This example of a boundary enacting page creates off- and online activities as particularly separate forms of everyday living. 

I view this page as an example of imagining the internet as an ‘inside’ version of the living world, related to but separated from the  ‘outside’ version of the living world.

The ‘outside’ presented here is a matter of (new) experiences of nature and engagements in physical movements. It is interesting that what ‘conventionally’ constitutes nature (= physical movements and biology) is in this example made somewhat exotic, peculiar and strange. The internet version of the living world is made ‘the natural’ way of being. However, even though the two versions are made to coexist, you need (to be motivated) to leave the one, in order to enter the other. 

My Translation:

This is where the internet ends
You have now reached the very last page on the internet. We hope you’ve enjoyed surfing. Now it’s time to go out and play.

Suggestions for what to do outside:

  • Take a walk. Which means using your legs for moving around – it’s called strolling
  • Jogging. This means moving around and using your legs a bit faster than when walking. If you jogg fast, it is called running.
  • Bicycling. Going by bike to experience nature in real 3D! Stop the bike once in a while and look at the trees and the rocks.
  • If it’s a hot day, and there’s water nearby, you can take a swim. This is not something you should do if you cannot swim. Then you can do something called bathing.
  • Visit someone you know
HTTP 101 – Have a splendid day!
Greetings the internet

I want to thank Jette Agerbo (http://virtuelkultur.blogspot.com/) for guiding my attention towards this lovely page called “This is where the internet ends”: http://www.ballade.dk/

Thanks to whoever made it. I just love it 🙂

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The online writings on this website may be cited or briefly quoted in line with the usual academic conventions. You may also copy or download them for your own personal use. However, the writings must not be published elsewhere (e.g. to mailing lists, bulletin boards etc.) without the author’s explicit permission. Please note that if you copy my writings you must:

• include this copyright note

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e.g. Hansbøl, Mikala: “This is where the internet ends”, published at Mikala’s Klumme – A researcher’s blog: https://mikalasklumme.wordpress.com/2008/02/08/this-is-where-the-internet-ends/. Version 15th February 2008.