Archive for February, 2008

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Thoughts from a being-becoming

February 15, 2008
Even though I might seem like a vessel
not changing that much every day
carrying my past, present and future with(in) me
my identity is clearly much more complex than being just a vessel
or a container filled with stuff and life-history
I am an actor multiple
a complex hybrid ‘nature-culture’ and ‘being-becoming’
I’m a cyborg
always part human intertwined with stuff
and I am because I become part of and enact actor-networks
This is me
I’m multiple and I’m a perpetuum mobile
I’m both a mom and wife
I’m Mikala
to some I’m Mix
an old colleague
a future colleague
a friend
a student
an employee in Microsoft
a humanistic ICT researcher
an educational researcher
I’m a sister and a daughter
a bridge player and a chess player
I couldn’t even begin to tell you about all my beings and not the least becomings
all of which could be described from particular positions and viewed through separate trajectories
but it would be a particular construction.
Really, I’m all together.
I’m everyday living
I’m both a center from where to make relations
and I’m a multi-player of relations to be made
I am complexity
I’m always both one and many variations of the one.
When I’m a mom it is particularly clear that I am metamorphosis and stability together
I can be mom-food, mom-bed, mom-chair, mom-toy, mom-playmate
all together and so much more
It is all a matter of taking multiple part through seeing-hearing-touching-talking-moving (in other words enacting) the world
Experiences and imaginaries are enactments forming and being formed by relationships
This is what the living world and being-becoming part of the living world is all about
I’m not simply a part of a complex world.
This is me – actor-networks.
I am complexity.
I’m movement.
I am world 

On-Line writings – Copyright

The online writings on this website may be cited or briefly quoted in line with the usual academic conventions. You may also copy or download them for your own personal use. However, the writings must not be published elsewhere (e.g. to mailing lists, bulletin boards etc.) without the author’s explicit permission. Please note that if you copy my writings you must:

• include this copyright note

• you should observe the conventions of academic citation in a version of the following form:

e.g. Hansbøl, Mikala: “Thoughts from a being-becoming”, published at Mikala’s Klumme – A researcher’s blog: https://mikalasklumme.wordpress.com/2008/02/15/thoughts-from-a-being-becoming/. Version March 1, 2008. 

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Actor-Network Theory on-line (incredible resources)

February 13, 2008

If you are thinking about getting to know more about Actor-Network theory, Lancaster University (where Professor John Law, senior lecturer Vicky Singleton, and Professor Lucy Suchman among other are working at the Department of Sociology) has an incredible on-line resource where it’s possible to find all kinds of interesting papers. See e.g. John Law: http://www.lancs.ac.uk/fass/sociology/research/resalph.htm#law

It is also worth visiting the Actor Network Resource maintained by John Law (Science Studies Centre, Department of Sociology, Lancaster University). Here you can find al sorts of valuable guidance in reading ANT literature e.g. central ANT discussions, how to get started reading, which themes ANT work has been focusing on, who to read when interested in particular subjects etc. See: http://www.lancs.ac.uk/fass/centres/css/ant/ant.htm

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Marilyn Strathern, ontological multiplicity and partial connections

February 8, 2008

In ANT-oriented STS literature, Marilyn Strathern is often referred to as a major source of inspiration.

It is especially her argument about the world being fractal rather than fragmented that is central. She has presented this argument in her book “Partial Connections” (2004 – updated edition). Strathern argues that we always only have access to making partial connections. There is (according to Strathern) no such thing as parts and wholes. When enacting the living world, we also enact holes. She argues that the world is always both one and multiply enacted – it is always both a container and what is contained. We cannot see it all at once.

Strathern’s point about the world being ontologically multiple is pursued further in Annemarie Mol’s original book “The Body Multiple” – see my reference to this here: https://mikalasklumme.wordpress.com/2007/11/18/science-and-technology-studies-sts-and-actor-network-theory-ant/).

ANT literature is critical towards a focus on what Mol calls “the politics of who” which is also called “perspectivism”. Perspectivism is the argument that there is epistemological multiplicity. The radical suggestion made by both Strathern’s and Mol’s (and other ANT literature) work is that there also exist multiple realities.

If that is the case, then realities/worldmakings are political, because other variations possibly exist and may be enacted (enactments of realities, however, are always socio-material workings, and thus not just a matter of free will and choice). To Mol and Strathern, worldmakings are not just a matter of multiple (subjective) perspectives on one and the same world (and hence, some perspectives are more likely to be judged more right/better than other). Researchers participate in worldmakings. This is why Mol in The Body Multiple call’s for both a “politics of who” and a “politics of what (a politics that includes ontology rather than presuming it)” (Mol, 2002, p.184). She emphasizes a focus on “coexistence” – hence the title The Body Multiple.  

These are two quote’s (and Strathern’s book “Partial Connections” is filled with them) that has made me think:

“Certainty itself appears partial, information intermittent. An answer is another question, a connection a gap, a similarity a difference, and vice versa.” (Strathern, 2004, p. xxiv).

“A world obsessed with ones and the multiplications and divisions of ones creates problems for the conceptualization of relationships.” (Strathern, 2004, p.  53)

References:

Strathern, Marilyn (2004): Partial Connections: Updated Edition. AltaMira Press. Originally published in 1991 by Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania.

I’ve also found an interesting lecture held by Marilyn Strathern at the Royal Anthropological Institute in 2004: Strathern, Marilyn (2006): A community of critics? Thought on new knowledge. The Huxley Memorial Lecture, given to the Royal Anthropolocial Institute, 8 December 2004. Royal Anthropological Institute. Also to be found on World Wide Web: http://www.alanmacfarlane.com/DO/filmshow/strathern_fast.htm. Localized on February 6th 2008.

And I’ve found a paper “Abstraction and decontextualization: An anthropological comment: Or e for ethnography” presented by Marilyn Strathern at an interesting conference bearing the provoking title: “Virtual Society? Get Real!” (see: http://virtualsociety.sbs.ox.ac.uk/GRpapers/strathern.htm). Localized on February 8th 2008.

On-Line writings – Copyright

The online writings on this website may be cited or briefly quoted in line with the usual academic conventions. You may also copy or download them for your own personal use. However, the writings must not be published elsewhere (e.g. to mailing lists, bulletin boards etc.) without the author’s explicit permission. Please note that if you copy my writings you must:

• include this copyright note

• you should observe the conventions of academic citation in a version of the following form:

e.g. Hansbøl, Mikala: “Marilyn Strathern, ontological multiplicity and partial connections”, published at Mikala’s Klumme – A researcher’s blog: https://mikalasklumme.wordpress.com/2008/02/08/marily-strathern-and-partial-connections/. Version 29th February 2008. 

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This is where the internet ends

February 8, 2008

There exist many versions of the very last page of the internet in English and Danish, and most likely in any language.

I’m interested in these kinds of pages (presented as one here) because I see them as examples of enacting spatiality through inserting differences.

This example of a boundary enacting page creates off- and online activities as particularly separate forms of everyday living. 

I view this page as an example of imagining the internet as an ‘inside’ version of the living world, related to but separated from the  ‘outside’ version of the living world.

The ‘outside’ presented here is a matter of (new) experiences of nature and engagements in physical movements. It is interesting that what ‘conventionally’ constitutes nature (= physical movements and biology) is in this example made somewhat exotic, peculiar and strange. The internet version of the living world is made ‘the natural’ way of being. However, even though the two versions are made to coexist, you need (to be motivated) to leave the one, in order to enter the other. 

My Translation:

This is where the internet ends
You have now reached the very last page on the internet. We hope you’ve enjoyed surfing. Now it’s time to go out and play.

Suggestions for what to do outside:

  • Take a walk. Which means using your legs for moving around – it’s called strolling
  • Jogging. This means moving around and using your legs a bit faster than when walking. If you jogg fast, it is called running.
  • Bicycling. Going by bike to experience nature in real 3D! Stop the bike once in a while and look at the trees and the rocks.
  • If it’s a hot day, and there’s water nearby, you can take a swim. This is not something you should do if you cannot swim. Then you can do something called bathing.
  • Visit someone you know
HTTP 101 – Have a splendid day!
Greetings the internet

I want to thank Jette Agerbo (http://virtuelkultur.blogspot.com/) for guiding my attention towards this lovely page called “This is where the internet ends”: http://www.ballade.dk/

Thanks to whoever made it. I just love it 🙂

On-Line writings – Copyright

The online writings on this website may be cited or briefly quoted in line with the usual academic conventions. You may also copy or download them for your own personal use. However, the writings must not be published elsewhere (e.g. to mailing lists, bulletin boards etc.) without the author’s explicit permission. Please note that if you copy my writings you must:

• include this copyright note

• you should observe the conventions of academic citation in a version of the following form:

e.g. Hansbøl, Mikala: “This is where the internet ends”, published at Mikala’s Klumme – A researcher’s blog: https://mikalasklumme.wordpress.com/2008/02/08/this-is-where-the-internet-ends/. Version 15th February 2008. 

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The Story of Stuff (This is worthwhile)

February 8, 2008

I recieved link to this – in multiple ways – interesting video with other ressources called “The Story of Stuff” with Annie Leonard: http://www.storyofstuff.com/

20 minutes that will be worthwhile! Trust me 🙂

I think it works both as an example of:

– e-learning

– what Science, Technology and Society Studies could be about

– a political statement

It’s an object multiple.  

Enjoy 🙂